The Asia-Pacific Centre for Neuromodulation (APCN) is a world leader in using deep brain stimulation to revolutionise the diagnosis and treatment of neurological disease. It integrates research, education and clinical care and ultimately will become the data hub for the Asia-Pacific region, linking to international research and clinical networks on neuromodulation technology and procedures. The Centre is a joint initiative of The University of Queensland and St Andrew's War Memorial Hospital, with funding commitments secured of approximately $10 million over five years. 

Who we are

The APCN builds off two decades of ground-breaking clinical research in the application of deep brain stimulation for the treatment of Parkinson's disease and various advanced and treatment-refractory conditions. 

The APCN is a joint initiative of the University of Queensland and St Andrew's War Memorial Hospital. It is poised to become an Asia Pacific research leader in neuromodulation treatment.

Research Leaders

What we do

APCN has been established as a neuromodulation innovation centre, emphasising the integration of research, education and clinical care for the greatest human benefit. The lead Clinicians, Professor Peter Silburn and Dr Terry Coyne are central to the centre. Professor Peter Silburn and Dr Terry Coyne have performed more than 500 DBS procedures, more than any other team in Australia and have helped many  people suffering from Parkinson's disease, Dystonia, Essential Tremor, Post-stroke disorders, and Tourette's syndrome.

Vision and mission

▪ To create new knowledge linked to neuromodulation and promote accelerated translation into cost-effective therapies for neurological diseases.


▪ To deliver breakthrough neuromodulation devices that can revolutionise the diagnosis and treatment of neurological diseases.


▪ To integrate patient care, education and research.


▪ To become the data hub in the Asia Pacific region for patient research and clinical data, linked to an international database.


▪ To research the neurobiological nature of human cognitive processes, such as movement, language and mood, and how they are impacted by neuromodulation that targets different parts of the brain.


Links & other important information

To volunteer to participate in a study, go to: Participate in QBI research